The COVID-19 vaccine and kids

Baystateparent Magazine
At least one trial including participants between age 12 and 18 with their parents’ permission is in progress.

When 

While millions of Americans are now free to get the COVID-19 vaccine, there are still many questions about when children will be able to receive the vaccine.

Here are a few things parents need to know about the COVID-19 vaccine and their kids, according to HopkinsMedicine.org:

Can my child get a COVID019 vaccine?: The Food and Drug Administration has authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for distribution to individuals ages 16 years and older. No COVID-19 vaccine has been authorized for children under 16. At least one trial including participants between age 12 and 18 with their parents’ permission is in progress. But it may be late 2021 or even 2022 before there is enough evidence on the timing, safety, effectiveness and practical aspects of vaccinating children for the coronavirus, especially children under age 12.

When can my child get a COVID-19 vaccine?: Some of the vaccine manufacturers have already begun recruiting for clinical trials and testing children 12 and older. Later, the manufacturers will evaluate safety and efficacy in younger age groups, and data from those studies will direct experts’ recommendations on COVID-19 vaccine use in younger children.

Will a COVID-19 vaccine protect me from infecting my child?: The answer to this question is unknown: Scientists are working hard to determine if getting vaccinated for the coronavirus keeps you from spreading COVID-19 to others, including children. For now, experts recommend you should assume you can spread the coronavirus to other people, even after you have been vaccinated.

Can I get COVID-19 from my child?: Yes, it is possible for a child infected with the coronavirus to transmit COVID-19 to another person. Data from some studies suggest that young children may be less likely than older children and adults to spread the coronavirus to others, but it can still happen.