With a new-age style of magic that mixes traditional illusions with music, dancing and technology, Adam Trent, 32, has been called David-Copperfield-meets-Justin-Timberlake. Showcasing his “futuristic” brand of magic, Trent has mesmerized audiences across the globe, and has been featured on America’s Got Talent, The Today Show, Ellen and The Rachael Ray Show. Straight out of the record-breaking Broadway smash hit The Illusionists, Trent is bringing his signature style of magic and illusion to Boston this month in a high-tech stage spectacle. On stage at the Boch Center Shubert Theatre from March 9-11, The Magic of Adam Trent is an immersive entertainment extravaganza of magic, comedy and music designed to entertain the whole family.

1. How did you first become interested in magic and illusion, and what drew you to it?

I began when I was 9 years old. I saw a magician with my whole family and it was the first time that I remember three generations of a family being equally entertained by something. I loved seeing the joy it brought to people when they witnessed something impossible.

2. What’s the first trick you mastered? When did you start performing for others?

Simple sleight of hand. I started performing at kids’ birthday parties when I was 9 years old.

3. Your tagline is “The next generation of magic.” What do you mean by that? What is “futuristic” magic?

I combine technology and spectacular visuals, anything from live hologram projections, to giant 16-foot LED walls that I step in and out of. There are cutting-edge illusions audiences have never seen before.

4. What stands out about your new show, The Magic of Adam Trent?

It’s produced by the producers behind Broadway’s The Illusionists, so it’s a chance for audiences across

the country to witness one of the world’s largest touring magic shows without having to go to NYC and pay a several hundred dollars for a ticket.

5. You’ve performed all over the world. What’s been your favorite spot?

My favorite places have been the Sydney Opera House, Radio City Music Hall, and Broadway.

6. Are you surprised you’ve been able to make a career out of magic? Did you have a back-up plan?

I have a degree in finance, but I always knew I would make a career out of magic, so I never planned on using a back-up plan.

7. What do you hope a kid who’s into magic would take away from watching you perform?

That any life choice and dream can come true if you are willing to work for it.

8. If you could give a budding magician three words of advice, what would they be?

Practice, practice, practice.